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20131202
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
inspire us. i said no, mr. mandela, you inspire us. so there was this unbelievable relationship between what was happening in america and what would happen in south africa. we would say from time to time the struggle in birmingham, the struggle in selma is inaccept raable from the struggle in sharpville. >> one of the reasons i wanted to talk to you today congressman was reading about and thinking about and trying to understand the importance of those decisions made by mandela and other apartheid leaders after sharpville, when they decided non-violence was not enough, they have been so committed to nonviolence, even in the face of incredible brutality, they needed some sort of military response as well. never ended up being the khai part of their response to apartheid, but they made that hard decision. how international were those discussions about the importance of non-violence and whether or not it was enough to overthrow governments and to change the world? >> here in america and around the world, there was ongoing discussion about the way of peace, the way of love, the way of non-vi
's a street party that continues on now for several days since mr. mandela's death was announced on thursday evening here. the street has been filling with marchers, with choirs, with schoolchildren, with ordinary people who have come from far and near to be here, to be part of a celebration of mr. mandela's life. all of this is perhaps a day of anticipation because tomorrow about a mile or so from here, that huge soccer stadium that seats some 80,000 people, there will be countless people gathering to come to mourn, to come and breathe and celebrate mr. mandela's life. it may be the largest organization ever, perhaps rivaling the services for pope john paul ii when there were 70 heads of state, kings and queens. we are hearing there will bow 50 or 60 heads of state. leaders from as far away as new zealand and australia also coming here. although the american delegation, as you mentioned, which was scaled down based on the wishes of the south african government, they are trying to limit this. there is just a huge outpouring for mr. mandela and literally the world wants to be here. millions m
mr. obama travelled to see the cell where mandela was held for nearly two decades. he described his relationship to the man he and many others affectionately called madiba. >> he is a personal hero and i don't think i am u meek in that regard. he's a hero for the world. >> back this south africa, the mood is part sadness, but part celebration. crowds gathered to remember nelson mandela who changed the world by committing his to the freedom of the south african people. >> i have nothing but deep gratitude they have given to me as an individual and let me state this. they were able to achieve anything, i know that this is because i am the servant of the people of south africa. >> it has been more than two decades since nelson mandela walked out of prison, but for those who lived through it, it seemed to be a piece of a larger puzzle. consider when mandela was freed, we were less than a year removed from china's tianamen square. the berlin wall came down the previous november. it was a fleeting moment in history, but for a time it showed humanity around the world was headed in the righ
outside and on the side of mr. mandela. that to continue our -- and echo them, would mean the destruction of this. it would mean to a civil war that no one would wish to go. >> as botha recalls, mandela's message of peace following years of action against apartheid, he made his famous speech that would lead to his imprisonment. >> he said that i have fought against one domination. and i have fought against black domination. i have cherished the idea of democratic and free society. all lift together and with equal opportunities. and then he concludes by saying this is the idea, i have to live for and to achieve. but it needs to be, it is an ideal for what i'm prepared to die. >> mandela was an icon, but he had a very human side, too, as botha would find out when he reached out to mandela during his presidential years. >> the second -- i think in march 1996 and got a message that he felt extremely lonely. so i phoned and he answered the phone. not the secretary. and i then conveyed my condolences and we -- to absorb this event now. and no empathy, friendship, only time first time he started
was given to a meeting with mandela at the hospital, but even then, he was far too frail and mr. obama huddled instead with the family inside this compound. then brought him to the prison. mr. obama referred to mandela by his south african name of endearment. madiba. >> madiba's words give us a compass in a sea of change. >> with mandela's passing, the president said others must now hold his moral compass. >> it falls to us as best we can to form the example that he set. to make decisions guided not by hate, but by love. never discount the difference that one person can make, to strive for a future worthy of his sacrifice. >> president obama will travel to south africa for services for mandela and is expected to be one of many world leaders asked to eulogize the political prisoner who became president. >> colin powell witnessed an historic moment when mandela was sworn in. mandela's leadership that day set his country on a path to unity and inspired the world. the former secretary of state is in washington. general powell, good morning. >> good morning, charlie, how are you? >> remembe
decision to release mr. mandela unconditionally. >> reporter: mandela emerged from behind bars without bitterness, to resume his campaign. >> africa. >> melson mandela sacrificed his personal freedom for our personal freedoms. >> reporter: his work was recognized with a nobel peace prize. as south africa's first black president, mandela remained a humble man. taking delight in a new york tickertape parade. dancing at a concert in his honor. meeting with world leaders and his civil rights hero. >> so help me god. >> reporter: as promised, he stepped down as president of south africa after serving just one term. >> south africa has been a despotic state through almost the whole of the 20th century. mandela's legacy stands against it. that is one of the best and most optimistic qualities that he hands to the people of south africa. >> reporter: by all accounts, the measure of this man can be taken by what he wants to be remembered for. here lies nelson mandela said, a man whos has done his duty on earth. >> keith miller reporting. joining us the council on foreign relations richard haas.
, this was not entirely unexpected news, given mr. mandela's health. how are south africans reacting? >> reporter: mara this was predictable news but painful none theless, announced late at night just before midnight south african time. many millions of south africans are still waking up to learn the news the father of this nation passed away during yesterday evening. first the mood here at nelson mandela's suburban home was fairly somber. now it is incredibly cell la braer to. people are bringing flowers, cheering, singing songs from the anti-apartheid struggle. they're celebrating his life and celebrating the lives they can now lead as a result of his anti-apartheid struggle. many people wondering here precisely what will happen next? what will the state event be. they're waiting for details about a lying in state which is expected in the next few days and about a burial which one american diplomat described as being the biggest state burial in the world since that of winston churhill. >> celebration of a remarkable life, rohit kachroo, thank you for that. >>> in so many ways nelson mandela is known
and to reflect on his life and then as the week progresses after the memorial service tomorrow, mr. mandela's body will lie in state at the union building and on sunday next week, the state funeral, the official funeral in his homeland homeland, very remote part of the country but where he wanted to be buried so, again, an emotional week, a long good-bye, a lot of mourning, but also a time to celebrate this life. >> ron allen for us, thank you. >>> we move to washington where a budget deal finally sounds imminent, "the washington post" reporting the finishing touches under way with a sealed deal expected on capitol hill. the first successful budget, of course, since 2011 but it amounts to little more than a cease-fire according to "the post" because the deal would not significantly reduce the $17.3 trillion in debt. it wouldn't close corporate tax loopholes. it wouldn't fully replace sequester cuts. in essence it appears it would just avoid another debt crisis on capitol hill. >>> a rare trip to pakistan for chuck hagel. it is the first trip there for a pentagon chief in three years. his me
life of. >> robert makes a very important point. yet politics has not been absent in the days since mr. mandela's passing, kate. i think what had happened in some corners of the conservative blogosphere, twittersphere -- i'm not from the 20th century. please don't ask me to use these words. on his facebook page commenters, including this person who couldn't spend his name called him a commune nist involved in torture, terror, murder and they have lost a lot of respect for senator cruz. it's amazing to me the vitriol that exists in parts of american society. people like nelson mandela who should be a hero for everybody the world over and especially here in the united states. >> he was a political person so people are going to have political feelings about him. kudos to senator cruz for what's being said on his facebook and going. he obviously wanted to go. >> which is less about nelson mandela and more about ted cruz. jonathan, in fairness if we're talking about conservatives who are quote, unquote, doing the right thing, newt gingrich called nelson mandela one of the greatest leaders o
in a gathering with mr. mandela. i'll never forget, he said you cannot be afraid to grow and evolve. you have got to be willing to continue to grow, if you're going to be effective, and he grew. you've got to remember there were a lot of nationalist groups that said he had turned soft, sold out. there were a lot of different tensions there. he was able to withstand the hatred and opposition of the african, a whites and he was focused on democracy. >> he was incredibly tenacious in that he had the question of black nationalism versus the question of integration. eugene, you have a great piece and i'll read an exert of it today. we should remember not only the man who embraced his former enemies but also the man who refused to be bowed by those enemies, who remained militant despite 27 years of imprisonment who walked out of jail with his head held high and eyes toward the future. >> we think of nelson mandela and see that smile that's like sunshine. it just lights up anyplace. i only had the experience of meeting him once, it was in '94 and he was already nelson mandela. but before, long before, i
president, almost from his arrival, he assumed a kind of command the first time his lawyer visz ited him, mr. mandela greeted them and to their amaizment as my code of honor. the authorities began treating him as a prison elder statesman. >> you have to understand, nelson mandela grew up in a house of royalty, the king in his village or in the village next to his was where he grew up. so he had a royal bearing. and i think he commanded respect. and he knew that. he didn't throw it around but he used it when it was important. so i think that, you know, during his time in prison, he did in fact begin to -- even though he may not have realized that he would ever get out of prison, but he took the steps that were necessary both with his comrades and the younger ones and older ones to be in a position to rule if that time ever came. i think this was the faith that eventually they would succeed that kept them all going. >> i want to hear you talk about the reaction you're seeing coming out of south africa to his passing. is the sense of mourning and sense of south africa losing its father figure a
told bishop tutu i disagree with you and with mr. mandela because tutu is that way as well. but i respect you. so why can't you guys in the republican party bring that to the the fore? >> well, nelson mandela stood up against a great injustice and willing to pay a huge price for that and that's the reason he mourned today because of that struggle that he performed. you are right, what he was advocating for was not necessarily the right answer, but he was fighting against some great injustice. and i would make the argument that, you know, we have a great injustice going on right now in this country with an everincreasing size of government that is taking over and controlling people's lives. and obamacare is front and center in that. i agree with talking points, your points earlier which is the center focus of the 2014 election, must be obamacare. and all of its aspects and the cool thing about obamacare is it is not only bad for the economy and bad for people's health. it's also bad for freedom of conscience. it's bad on a whole variety of issues that will energize all across ameri
in london. and two of his young daughters, mr. mandela's daughters were there and found out their father had passed during the premiere and they wanted you to continue showing the film. >> yeah. you know, it was an awful time. we did an opening, we spoke to the audience. i spoke personally about my dad who just passed and i based my character on -- i based his personality on my dad. and, you know, literally half an hour, 45 minutes into the film the news broke in amongst the cinema. and justin and myself and the producers, we went outside to sort of figure out what to do next, because it was awful. everyone was so in shock. and they said just keep going. let the film keep going. and then, you know, once the film, the credits started rolling, we went back on stage and we announced it. >> i want to play a clip from the film. in this scene, idris, you play a young mandela who goes to a theater and interrupts the movie to encourage people to fight apartheid. let's take a look. >> she is good looking, but you must give me sophia loren any day. we are the people of this nation but we don't have po
want to show you the marquee back in 1990 when nelson mandela visited here. it says, mr. and mrs. a&m, welcome home. we love you. we love you. we love you. over the course of that visit to new york city, 750 people throughout the city saw him and of course, chris, you might remember that. mario cuomo was the governor, dinkins was the mayor and nelson mandela made a big splash here and big impression on new york when he visited here. >> i remember many said they never met anyone like nelson mandela. we'll check back in with you later on. >>> right now we get perspect e perspective, though, nelson mandela devoted himself to humanitarian work. sir richard branson worked with nelson mandela on many projects and helped him form a group called the elders. a very important part for nelson mandela to what should be his legacy. sir richard branson joins us now. thanks for joining us. great to have you on the show. i want to say first, nelson mandela was a personal friend as well as a role model and i am sorry for your loss this morning. but thank you for joining us. >> thank you very much.
. mr. obama said of mandela what was said of another great emancipator, abraham lincoln: "he belongs to the ages." mandela's legacy, the president said, is a free south africa at peace with itself, an example to the world. for cbs news, i'm scott pelley. good night. captioning sponsored by cbs captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, [ female announcer ] for those who love sweets your season is here. let's just call it the baking time of year. you need special ingredients. you need the staples for homemade. you need safeway sugar for just a buck eighty-eight. and that magic thing that makes everyone want another only two ninety-nine and when hands get messy, quite surely they'll say, yum! wow! yay! what a sweeter holiday. safeway. ingredients for life.
and soweto. different creeds and colors honoring the same man as father. >> this is a special mass for mr. mandela. >> reporter: tears and keers capturing the love for father as south africans called mandela. the greatest memorial may be the faces, black and white together, parents bring children who will live a life madiba made possible. >> they were born free in south africa. they experience all the fruit. >> reporter: which pride and legacy, there is also lochlts one man has mandela's image on his car and says he hasn't been able to sleep or eat sense he heard the news. >> how can i live without madiba? i'm so sad. >> reporter: the long good bye will continue all week, adding to the legend and legacy of nelson mandela. you know on friday they had a ceremony for nelson mandela, a traditional african one where they closed his eyes. wherever he is, i hope his ears are opened, to hear this, this is what they say would be the greatest memorial for fell nnel mandela, living apart. that's what's going on right now as a buildup to tomorrow t. kind of sendoff and a memorial we haven't seen. 90,
of the congress, it is my great privilege and i deem it a high honor and personal pleasure to present to you mr. nelson mandela, deputy president of the african national congr s congress. >> it was a news congress back in 1990, crowds of americans, black person americans, all sorts of americans turned out in droves for the chance to be in the presence of, in the remote vicinity of men of rare courage, character and compassion. you probably heard of a bronx cheer. check out what happened when nelson mandela showed up at yankee stadium back then. >> you now know who i am. i am a yankee! [ cheers ] . >> and i don't even think a red sox fan would mind that. i speak as a red sox fan. you would never know, though, looking at that scene, for nelson mandela to be there at yankee stadium for him to stand on capitol hill and be hailed by democrats and republicans in congress. for that trip to the united states to happen back in 1990, nelson mandela had to receive a special waiver from the u.s. department of state. otherwise, he never would have been allowed in the country. that's because he was a member
on "jansing and co." back in june about nelson mandela's legacy. in a statement following his death, mrs. evers said, quote, we are all students of mandela for he taught us about faith, perseverance, and devotion to one's ideals. morgan freeman, sydney patiya both portrayed him in films. the long walk to freedom chronicles his life from childhood through his inauguration. it also looks at his relationship with his wife winnie played by naomi harris. and the film's director justin chadwick talked to me about the film. >> we all know mandela the great political leader, the activist, but we don't know him as a young man. as a man who loved cars, tailoring, who is the most amazing lawyer in his early days in the first black lawyer in johannesburg. so we want to explore a mandela that hadn't been seen before that people don't know, that's not in the history books. >> last night prince william and his wife kate attend the uk premiere for that film in london. they along with the rest of the audience found out about his death while the credits were rolling. >> we're just reminded of what an extr
and mrs. bush. >>> another former president is remembering mandela today. president bill clinton, who talked with the anchor of this week, george stephanopoulos. >> he once told me that he lived on hatred, when he went into prison. he said after 11 years he realized that they had taken about everything they could take from him except his mind and heart. he said, i realized that those are things you have to give away, and i decided not to give them away. >> mahatma gandhi, abe lincoln, george washington. he belongs in that group. >> he does. you know, in my lifetime, gandhi and mandela, in no small measure, because of their willingness to give up the comforts of ordinary life, they symbolize the world we'd all like to live in, if we could just be a little bigger, if we could be a little more like them. >> president clinton with george stephanopoulos, president clinton once asked mandela if he still hated his oppressors, mandela answered, nope, they had me 27 years in prison, if i hated them when i walked out the door, they would still have me. >>> and now, we turn next to what was a bi
or a policy or politics was a protest against apartheid. >> reporter: as a senator obama had visited mandela, and the president and mrs. obama brought their doubters to robben island prison so they could better understand what mandela had suffered. after he died, michelle obama tweeted we will forever draw strength and inspiration from nelson mandela's extraordinary example of moral courage, kindness and humility. bill clinton tweeted a picture and wrote, "i will never forget my friend madibaa," use the affectionate name by which mandela was known to his followers. mandela wasn't always on the u.s. side. in the 1980s president reagan supported apartheid regime, and eastern as protests broke out an college campuses across america demanding the u.s. punish the regime. ♪ ♪ free mandela >> reporter: "free nelson mandela" became a popular anthem for black and white americans. finally, congress, including key republicans, overrode reagan's veto imposing the economic sanctions that helped break the apartheid regime. that set the stage for mandela's triumphant visit to washington as his country'
. with his plan to name a black ambassador now on hold, mr. reagan was left proposing ref m reforms south africa, a timetable for end ago part hide, release of political prisoners including mandela and discussions with black groups including the african national congress. the president stressed all south africans must work out their future together. >> as one african remarked recently, southern africa is like a zebra. if the white parts are injured, the black parts will die, too. >> and reagan did have some allies in congress. >> by intruding into the affairs of the south african government, we are shooting the farmers of america in the foot. and i will have no part of it. >> in the end, for all of ronald reagan's charisma and persuasive ability, for all his sway over congressional republicans, both houses of congress voted to impose the sanctions. and even after reagan vetoed the measure, both the house and senate went back and voted to override his veto. and it wasn't just the usual suspects fighting reagan. the senate was controlled at the time by republicans. this was an open revolt f
the warmth of mr. obama's performance. he looks good. >> welcome to "cbs this morning saturday," i'm anthony mason. >> and i'm venita meyer. >>> the lighting of the christmas tree became the celebration of the life of nelson mandela. >> senior white house correspondent bill plant joins us with more on that. >> reporter: good morning, well washington has temporarily put aside its usual battles over health care and the budget to pay tribute to nelson mandela. but as you mentioned, there was one annual presidential tradition yesterday, which did not go unobserved. >> three, two, one -- [ cheers and applause ] >> reporter: president obama joined by his family pushed the button to bathe the national christmas tree in a warm holiday glow. and later remembered the man he says has been a major inspiration. >> and this year we give a special measure of gratitude for nelson mandela a man who championed that generosity of spirit. in his life he blessed us with tremendous grace and unbelievable courage. and we are all privileged to live in a world touched by his goodne
stunning, saying thicks like go home, ted, you're drunk. he, mandela, was communist terrorist and targeted people for no other reason than being white. stunned to see you support this scumb scumbag, mr. cruz. he was a communist, a huge supporter of abortion. putting him in the same language of stalin, fdr, who are also dead and don't deserve a eulogy either. what does that tell us about the generations reflecting on this? >> shocking comments. these are ted cruz's ostensible supporters. how incredibly disturbing must it be for americans to read that, to say this is -- this vein of political thought, however large or small it is, exists in our country. >> i hope it's disturbing to us. >> i hope so. >> i'm mostly disturbed that maybe it isn't disturbing to us. >> obviously americans who agree with it, they're out there. i can't imagine it's a very large population, but it saez lot about people have asked for a long time what's the racial perspective of tea party members. unfortunately this is the perspective of some of them. >> remember, where you started the conversation about dr. king, i w
want. natalie? >> absolutely. go get yourself a hot chocolate, dylan. thank you. >>> president and mrs. obama are traveling to south africa today to attend tuesday's public memorial service for nelson mandela. the anti-apartheid icon died thursday at the age of 95. former president george w. bush and his wife were invited to join the obamas aboard air force one. president obama's expected to speak at the service which is being held at a 90,000-seat sports stadium in johannesburg. >>> some of the nation's top reformers of all time were honored last night in washington. piano man billy joel, opera star martina arroyo, herbie hancock, shirley maclaine and carlos santana received kennedy center honors. the president was among those paying tribute. >>> prince harry's trek to the south pole with the teams of wounded service members including one from the u.s. is no longer a race. nbc's ayman mohyeldin tells us why it's been turned into an exercise of survival and cooperation. >> reporter: it began as a race to the south pole. wounded soldiers, hollywood actors and a prince. three teams all r
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)